What’s happening with the Colorado River Drought plans?

‘Done’ isn’t done: What’s happening with the Colorado River drought plans?

by Luke Runyon and Bret Jaspers of KJZZ, published 7 February 2019

“The seven states that rely on the Colorado River for water haven’t been able to finish a series of agreements that would keep its biggest reservoirs, Lake Mead and Lake Powell, from dropping to levels not seen since they were filled decades ago.

Five states — Colorado, Utah, New Mexico, Wyoming and Nevada — are done. So is northern Mexico. But California and Arizona failed to meet the federal government’s Jan. 31 deadline to wrap up negotiations and sign a final agreement.”

Read the full article at Cronkite News published by Arizona PBS.

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The Water Conflict Chronology – Water Conflicts over the Centuries and Millennia

Water, or lack thereof, is often at the front lines of conflict. By documenting water conflict across history, Dr. Peter Gleick, chief scientist and president emeritus of the Pacific Institute, explores the instances where water and violence have gone hand and hand. His water conflict chronology is a fascinating river throughout history and was just updated. In our latest podcast, Gleick tells us about some of the lessons learned and highlights from this water conflict chronology, and explores what kind of trends have emerged, and what we can expect in the future.

The Water Conflict Chronology – Water Conflicts over the Centuries and Millennia by Circle of Blue is licensed under a Creative Commons License.
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